Reading for the year 2013

For the last couple of years I have used a website www.goodreads.com as a means of keeping track of what I read and what others who I am linked to read. It has been really worthwhile as a tool to widen my reading and to see what others are or have read. It also allows you to set a reading target over the year – you set yourself x number of books and you include this on the site. It then monitors if you are ahead or behind with the target. I find it useful, and would recommend it to anyone. For the last two years I have had a target of 50 and 40 books, but this year is going to be different.

On my bookshelf I have a collection of books. Some have been read in part as I went about my Theology degree (the intention is to re-read this fully), books I have gained along the way, and also some collections. I currently have Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics which have been largely untouched since we bout the whole collection about 7 years ago. I have been attracted to him via one of my favourite theologians Jurgen Moltmann, and so my intention is to wade my way through these whilst having some lighter reading as well!

I must say, one of my ambitions is to learn German so that I can read the writings of Barth, Moltmann and Bonhoeffer in the original German. I doubt if I will ever be in that position though.

In preparation, I am currently reading John Webster’s contribution to a series called ‘Outstanding Christian Thinkers’ on Barth, as a primer before I go ahead with the project in January. It is going to be a daunting task, but one in which I hope I find rewarding. New views and ideas are the things that stimulated Karl Barth, and so I hope the same thing happens with me. Again, one of the attractions is an opportunity to try and understand Barth’s thinking during the horrors of the 1st and 2nd World Wars.

I’ll hopefully let you know on this blog how I am getting on…… .

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This entry was posted in Academia, Bonhoeffer, Christianity, Church, Discipleship, Karl Barth, Politics, Preaching, Prison, Theology. Bookmark the permalink.

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