Thoughts on when people you know die…

 

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Martin Doig, rest in peace.

Back in those dark days of 1984 onwards, I was serving in the RAF at a place called JARIC. I remember a bunch of new Plotters arriving… they are the younger faces in the photograph below. Amongst those is a Martin Doig standing second from our left. I came home from a Regional Conference and discovered on Facebook that Martin (now a Flt. Sgt PI) had gone for a lunch time run, returned only to die of a heart attack. A tragic end to a life in todays ageing population. He will be missed by his family dearly, he will be missed by his colleagues and ex-colleagues greatly.

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Philip Yancey writes – ‘”Health Clubs are a booming industry, as are nutrition and health food stores. We treat physical health like a religion. Meanwhile we wall off death’s blunt reminders – mortuaries, intensive care units, cemeteries (and hospices, my own inclusion).

In removing such taboos, we have largely removed death from our day-to-day experience. But there is a flip side: we have also lost the ability to accept the end of life when it does finally come. I do not mean that we should belittle a dying person’s fears by coaxing him to accept death as a friend, as some experts do. There is good reason to view death as an enemy, which is the way the Bible describes it.”

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